What are the differences between NHS and private dentistry?

Coronavirus COVID-19 Update

The Chief Dental Officer (CDO MARCH 2020) has released a statement :

ALL DENTAL PRACTICES IN THE UK HAVE BEEN ORDERED TO:

  • Cease all care of anyone who is classed as non urgent and stop all procedures that generate aerosols.
  • Dental Practices - the staff are at high risk of contracting the virus from the public and should only offer a dental service if they have the resources and the PPE.

At Hoddesdon Dental Surgery, until further notice, we will be stopping ALL Dental Care - from WEDNESDAY THIS WEEK (25th March 2020).

We strongly advise patients to avoid seeking dental assistance until the virus has been controlled and practice self isolation for their own and others safety.

IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING FOR EXAMPLE : then wait until the dental practice reopens :

Routine care such as a dental check up and hygiene treatment 

Fillings and other treatments that are not urgent .

  • Mild or moderate pain: that is, pain not associated with an urgent care condition and that responds to pain-relief measures
  • Minor dental trauma
  • Post-extraction bleeding that the patient is able to control using self-help measures
  • Loose or displaced crowns, bridges or veneers
  • Fractured or loose-fitting dentures and other appliances
  • Fractured posts
  • Fractured, loose or displaced fillings
  • Treatments normally associated with routine dental care
  • Bleeding gums
  • ORTHODONTICS/ INVISALIGN OR COSMETIC OR IMPLANT WORK

WHAT IS CLASSED AS A DENTAL EMERGENCY?

Dental emergencies include:

  • Trauma including facial/oral laceration and/or dentoalveolar injuries, for example avulsion of a permanent tooth
  • Oro-facial swelling that is significant and worsening
  • Post-extraction bleeding that the patient is not able to control with local measures
  • Dental conditions that have resulted in acute systemic illness or raised temperature as a result of dental infection
  • Severe trismus
  • Oro-dental conditions that are likely to exacerbate systemic medical conditions such as diabetes (that is lead to acute decompensation of medical conditions such as diabetes)

PLEASE NOTE – YOU WlLL NOT BE SEEN BY THE EMERGENCY DENTAL SERVICE OR BY OUR DENTAL STAFF AT HODDESDON DENTAL SURGERY IF YOU DO NOT FALL INTO THESE CATEGORIES.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU DO FALL INTO A DENTAL EMERGENCY CATEGORY THAT CAN NOT WAIT : 

  • Contact the practice on 01992 462 043

We are running a phone triage system and will have to filter those that we can and cannot see.

  • Contact NHS 111 services if you cannot wait for the practice to get back to you.

(it may take upto 48 hours for us to get back to you as we will be dealing with other emergencies)

NO HIGH RISK PATIENT WILL BE SEEN AT HODDESDON DENTAL SURGERY: 

  • All high risk or infected patients can find out the local high risk dental centre by calling NHS 111 (where special facilities have been set up)

Many patients are confused about the difference between private and NHS dental treatment so we have outlined some of the differences below. The common assumption is that private dentistry is more expensive but this may not always be the case and usually the service and treatment outcome you receive is better and unrestricted.

Private

  • Cosmetic treatment is not available on the NHS. This means the materials/treatments which produce the best appearance are often not used. Private treatment will always give you the best possible functional but also cosmetic result.
  • You are able to have private appointments at anytime a practice is open including in the evening after 5pm or on Saturdays and sometimes Sundays
  • Private treatment gives us complete freedom to provide the very highest standard of treatment and materials. We have no funding restrictions and focus purely on quality of the treatment.
  • Private work such as dentures, crowns, bridges and implants are usually sent to different private laboratories where named experienced technicians hand make the item. In our case we have used the same award winning private dental laboratory and technicians since 2005. There is also usually more flexibility in returning items from a private laboratory quickly.
  • Appointments are longer to allow plenty of time to complete your treatment at a more relaxed pace.
  • Certain treatments are not always available on the NHS eg. dental implants
  • Tooth whitening is not usually available on the NHS
  • With private treatments you can request your treatment to be performed by a specialist and be given quick and easy access eg. a difficult extraction
  • Orthodontic treatment for patients over the age of 18 is usually not available on the NHS and invisalign is usually not offered on the NHS
  • Your dentist will discuss your treatment options and costs and give you a written estimate before you commit to any treatment

NHS

  • NHS patients are treated with the same care as our private patients though the government does impose some restrictions and fixes the patient charges nationally
  • Treatment needs to be functional on the NHS and not for cosmetic reasons
  • NHS treatment is designed to be cost effective for the tax payer and each NHS clinic works to a fixed NHS budget so naturally this means more cost effective materials and laboratories are used
  • We must follow government guidelines for recalling patients which may mean you may not be entitled to a check up or clean as often as you want.
  • NHS cleaning is designed to ensure gum health and treat what is clinically necessary eg gum disease and not to specifically remove all stains or for cosmetic reasons
  • Appointment availability may be limited. You may not be able to get appointments outside school or work hours. You may also not be able to see more experienced dentists or specialists who choose to work outside the NHS
  • The government imposes limits on the amount of NHS treatment each practice can provide and the contracts are usually Monday to Friday 9-5. Once a clinic reaches its NHS limit they may not be able to offer any more NHS treatment until the next financial year
  • There are NHS clinics which will have contracts to provide emergency services on weekends and Bank holidays
  • Some treatments are not available under the NHS at all or in certain cases eg. cosmetic treatments / dental implants or certain preventative treatments eg. fissure sealants for low decay risk patients
  • Tooth whitening is usually not available on the NHS
  • Hygienists are usually not funded by the NHS
  • Specialist referral on the NHS may not always be available and you may have to be placed on a waiting list if accepted

Your dentist should always give you a choice of NHS and private treatment options to enable you to make a choice which is right for you. You should then always be given a written treatment plan so you can see the treatment required and likely cost of treatment. In summary NHS dentistry is designed to be functional, whereas private dentistry is usually functional and cosmetic. Each treatment plan is individual and it is best to discuss with your dentist the available NHS and private options.