Extractions

Coronavirus COVID-19 Update

The Chief Dental Officer (CDO MARCH 2020) has released a statement :

ALL DENTAL PRACTICES IN THE UK HAVE BEEN ORDERED TO:

  • Cease all care of anyone who is classed as non urgent and stop all procedures that generate aerosols.
  • Dental Practices - the staff are at high risk of contracting the virus from the public and should only offer a dental service if they have the resources and the PPE.

At Hoddesdon Dental Surgery, until further notice, we will be stopping ALL Dental Care - from WEDNESDAY THIS WEEK (25th March 2020).

We strongly advise patients to avoid seeking dental assistance until the virus has been controlled and practice self isolation for their own and others safety.

IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING FOR EXAMPLE : then wait until the dental practice reopens :

Routine care such as a dental check up and hygiene treatment 

Fillings and other treatments that are not urgent .

  • Mild or moderate pain: that is, pain not associated with an urgent care condition and that responds to pain-relief measures
  • Minor dental trauma
  • Post-extraction bleeding that the patient is able to control using self-help measures
  • Loose or displaced crowns, bridges or veneers
  • Fractured or loose-fitting dentures and other appliances
  • Fractured posts
  • Fractured, loose or displaced fillings
  • Treatments normally associated with routine dental care
  • Bleeding gums
  • ORTHODONTICS/ INVISALIGN OR COSMETIC OR IMPLANT WORK

WHAT IS CLASSED AS A DENTAL EMERGENCY?

Dental emergencies include:

  • Trauma including facial/oral laceration and/or dentoalveolar injuries, for example avulsion of a permanent tooth
  • Oro-facial swelling that is significant and worsening
  • Post-extraction bleeding that the patient is not able to control with local measures
  • Dental conditions that have resulted in acute systemic illness or raised temperature as a result of dental infection
  • Severe trismus
  • Oro-dental conditions that are likely to exacerbate systemic medical conditions such as diabetes (that is lead to acute decompensation of medical conditions such as diabetes)

PLEASE NOTE – YOU WlLL NOT BE SEEN BY THE EMERGENCY DENTAL SERVICE OR BY OUR DENTAL STAFF AT HODDESDON DENTAL SURGERY IF YOU DO NOT FALL INTO THESE CATEGORIES.

WHAT TO DO IF YOU DO FALL INTO A DENTAL EMERGENCY CATEGORY THAT CAN NOT WAIT : 

  • Contact the practice on 01992 462 043

We are running a phone triage system and will have to filter those that we can and cannot see.

  • Contact NHS 111 services if you cannot wait for the practice to get back to you.

(it may take upto 48 hours for us to get back to you as we will be dealing with other emergencies)

NO HIGH RISK PATIENT WILL BE SEEN AT HODDESDON DENTAL SURGERY: 

  • All high risk or infected patients can find out the local high risk dental centre by calling NHS 111 (where special facilities have been set up)

Having a tooth out is the same as having an operation and, because of this, you must look after the area to speed healing and to reduce the risk of infection. Here are some pointers:

  • For the first 24 hours, try to avoid eating hot food, don't smoke, don't drink any alcohol and try not to disturb any blood clot which might have formed. However, after the tooth is removed if the clot is lost by premature rinsing for example the bone can be exposed to the air this can be very painful

  • Don't rinse your mouth for 24 hours after extraction. After that, rinse gently with warm salty water - half a teaspoon of salt in a glass of water is enough.
  • Brush your teeth as normal to keep your mouth as clean as possible.
  • You may feel some small pieces of bone work their way out of the socket - don't worry, this is perfectly normal.
  • There may be some swelling and a bit of discomfort in the first two to three days. If you need to, take some ordinary painkillers - aspirin, ibuprofen or paracetamol will be fine.
  • If you feel pain a few days after the tooth has been removed, it might be where the blood clot has broken down leaving an empty hole in the gum. This is called a 'dry socket' and will need to be looked at by your dentist. Simply go back and the dentist will pack the wound to ease your discomfort.

Your dentist may have given you some gauze to place onto the area where the tooth has been removed - if not, a clean cloth handkerchief will do just as well (but not a paper tissue).

Roll it into a small firm pad large enough to fit over the gap (probably around 1cm by 3cm).
Sit up and gently clear away any blood clots around the gap using the gauze or hanky.
Put a clean pad over the gap (from tongue side to cheek side) and bite down on it firmly for 10 to 15 minutes.
Take the pad off and check whether the bleeding has stopped. If not, apply a fresh pad and contact your dentist.


Wisdom Teeth

Sometimes there may not be room in your mouth for your wisdom teeth and, as they start to come through, they push against the teeth already there or may start to come through at an angle. When this happens, you might feel some pain or discomfort, so the best thing to do is to visit your dentist.

The dentist will probably take an x-ray of your mouth to see how or if your wisdom teeth are coming through. From this, they will be able to make a judgement on whether or not to take them out, and how easy or difficult it might be. Extractions can also be done under sedation.